Myths & Truths About Child Vaccinations Revealed

Children are more likely to live healthier, longer lives thanks to advancements made in medicine. Immunizations give you the power to give your child a healthy start in life. Vaccines have already reduced the number of diseases in the world. For example, measles was once a typical illness in the 1950s. However, the measles vaccine has reduced the disease. Now, very few doctors even see a case of measles.

Vaccines are still a relatively new concept, medically speaking. It wasn't until the 1990s that heavy education on the importance of child vaccines began. Even today, in 2018, some parents are still wary of the long term effects of child vaccines. However, it’s important to remember that vaccines are extremely safe. In fact, there is rarely a reason why anyone shouldn't get a vaccine.

Doctors and other healthcare professionals have been trying to debunk vaccine myths for years. Some parents refuse to vaccinate their children, even with numerous studies proving the safety of vaccines. This has created health consequences for their children and their entire community.

Don’t let any vaccine misconception keep you from making the best healthcare decisions for your family. Take advantage of the benefits vaccines create. Keep reading to learn the truth behind several popular child vaccine myths.

Myth #1: Infant Immune Systems Can’t Handle Vaccines

The immune system of an infant is stronger than you think. The amount of antibodies in an infant’s immune system makes it theoretically possible for an infant to receive 10,000 vaccines at a time.

There are 14 vaccines doctors recommend your child gets before the age of 2. Thanks to today’s vaccines, children exposed to fewer diseases than previous generations.

Myth #2: Vaccines Will Infect My Child With The Disease It’s Trying To Prevent

While there is a possibility vaccines can cause symptoms of the disease they’re trying to prevent, you have nothing to worry about. In the rare cases this does happen, the symptoms are mild and non-threatening. This is because the child is not actually infected. Instead the child’s immune system is responded to the vaccine, creating the visible symptoms you notice.

Myth #3: Other Kids Are Vaccinated, I Don’t Need To Vaccinate Mine

It is possible for your kid to remain unvaccinated and perfectly healthy. This is because of “herd immunity”. Herd immunity happens when the majority of the population is vaccinated. Immune citizens help protect the immunity of the unvaccinated minority. They make it harder for diseases to spread. After all, a disease has no one to infect if everyone is immune.

However, herd immunity can disappear if not enough people are getting vaccinated. Parents mistakenly believe they don't have to vaccinate their children. However, unvaccinated chiLack of vaccinations in children creates a dangerous situation. Diseases have more opportunities to spread and infect unvaccinated communities. In addition, diseases brought back from foreign countries can result in health problems at home. This is especially dangerous for newborns, pregnant women, and elderly citizens who have weakened immune systems.

Myth #4: Vaccines Can Cause Autism

Many parents fear vaccines causing autism in their children. One fear is that the thimerosal gives children autism. However, there is no evidence linking thimerosal to autism. Furthermore, thimerosal has not been used in infant or child vaccines for many years.

The MMR vaccine is another immunization accused of causing autism. This is likely due to most children getting diagnosed with autism around the same age the MMR vaccine is recommended. However, scientific studies from all over the world have found no connection between the vaccine and autism.

Myth #5: Natural Immunity Is Better Than Vaccine Immunity

There are cases when surviving a disease gives a person a stronger immunity against that particular disease. However, this doesn't mean you should try to get your child sick. The negative side effects of catching a disease far outweigh any possible benefits. Even if the benefit is immunity. Especially when a simple vaccine can do the same thing, without endangering your child’s health.

For example, if someone wanted to get an immunity to measles by catching the disease, they would face a 1 in 500 chance of dying. On the other hand, the chances of someone suffering an allergic reaction while getting the measles vaccine is one in a million.

Give Your Family The Vaccines They Need

After learning the truth about vaccines, you’re probably ready to take the first step towards protecting your children from vaccine-preventable diseases. But where do you begin?

Start by reaching out to your local healthcare provider to learn more. Schedule an appointment to discuss vaccine options with your child's pediatrician. Vaccines are an important life-saving tool and should be available to everyone. If you’re worried you can’t afford vaccines for your children, reach out to the Vaccines For Children Program . This federally funded program specializes in helping low-income families get free vaccines. Call their toll free number, 800-232-4636, to get started.

Want a stress-free vaccine appointment? Visit a local immunization clinic. For example, VNA & Hospice has an immunization clinic designed to serve the vaccine needs of citizens throughout California’s central coast. There are many options available. In fact, vaccinating  your children is easier now more than ever. Take the first step to protect them from dangerous diseases today.


National Infant Immunization Week: What You Need To Know

How much do you know about National Infant Immunization Week (NIIW)? From April 21, 2018- April 28, 2018, health care professionals all over the country discuss the importance of vaccines. This special week recognizes the benefits of immunizations for infants and young children. For many years, healthcare providers from all over the United States have been working with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to discuss the positive impact of vaccines in children’s health. They also highlight noteworthy achievements of immunization around the world.

Infant immunizations are a powerful medical tool that improves the health and life quality of young children everywhere. However, not everyone thinks infants should get vaccines. Infant immunization is still a controversial topic.  Unfortunately, harmful vaccine myths only deepened the controversy.

April is the perfect time to reveal the truth about childhood vaccines. There are several ways you and your friends can do this. For example, you can stop the spread of misinformation. Or,you an help educate your community about the importance of vaccines. If all of this seems a little confusing, don't worry. Soon you'll know everything you need to know to make a helpful impact. Keep reading to discover everything you need to know about National Infant Immunization Week.

Why Was National Infant Immunization Week Created?

National Infant Immunization Week was created to help spread immunization awareness. Some of the main goals include:

1.) Have healthcare providers simultaneously promote the benefits of immunization.

2.) Improve the equity of the use of vaccines.

3.) Make universal vaccines a reality.

4.) Increase assistance with cross-border immunization activities.

5.) Educate parents on the importance of infant immunization.

6.) Create better communication between doctors and parents.

7.) Help low-income parents vaccinate their infants

National Infant Immunization Week has been very helpful. Since it's creation, many disease control milestones have been achieved. First, vaccines reduce the amount of infant deaths caused by preventable diseases. Vaccines also:

  • Protect properly immunized children under the age of two from 14 vaccine-preventable diseases.
  • Eliminate the spread of measles. Measles used to be a common in the 1950's for children to suffer to measles. Today, the measles vaccine has almost completely gotten rid of measles. Furthermore, few practicing healthcare professionals ever see a case of measles.

Why Are Infant Immunizations Important?

It can be tempting to think of diseases as a thing of the past. However, parents shouldn’t ignore the importance of infant immunizations. There are still children who catch terrifying vaccine-preventable diseases. This can happen even in the United States. Thankfully, routine child immunizations are making things better. Vaccines prevent nearly 381 million illnesses and 24.5 million hospitalizations. In addition, infant immunizations are a key factor in preventing an estimate of 855,000 early deaths.

Don't forget, infant immunizations also benefit the economy. Just think of how much money is saved by eliminating so many illnesses, hospitalizations, and untimely deaths. In fact, disease-preventing vaccines are estimated to create a net savings of $1.65 trillion in societal costs.

What Are The Dangers Of Immunization Myths

There are numerous records proving the success of infant immunizations. In fact, it may be hard to believe that some parents are opposed to the idea of vaccinating their children. Immunizations have achieved a lot of medical success over the years. Despite this, several myths about infant immunizations continue to flood the media. Unfortunately, this causes some parents to become distrustful of vaccines. As a result, they can place their children’s health at risk.

Parents who believe vaccine myths may end up choosing not to vaccinate their child. As a result, their child faces the risk of catching a vaccine-preventable diseases. For example, you may remember that few doctors today ever see a case of measles. This is mainly due to the measles vaccine. However, America experienced a large number of mesale cases in 2014. Twenty-seven states reported 667 measle cases to the CDC. The leading theory is this record number outbreak was caused by parents who chose not to vaccinate their children.

What To Do During National Infant Immunization Week

Anyone can participate in National Infant Immunization Week. In fact, there are a variety of NIIW opportunities for everyone. Are you a parent? Make sure your infant’s immunization records are current. Don't have any children? You can still help. Educate others about infant vaccines to put an end to preventable diseases.

One of the best ways you can help is by sharing important infant vaccine information with the parents and caregivers in your community. Try doing any of the following:

  • Educate parents and caregivers about the crucial role vaccinations play in protecting infants from vaccine-preventable diseases.
  • Work with local healthcare providers to facilitate better communication between doctors and parents.
  • Discuss the dangers of vaccine-preventable diseases to young children.
  • Highlight the achievements immunization advancements have made over the years.
  • Inform parents, caregivers, and teachers about a Vaccines for Children's number, 800-232-4636. This program was created to help low-income parents get vaccines for their children. One can call toll free number for assistance. This includes finding local vaccine areas.
  • Use the power of your social media account to share stories that highlight the importance of childhood immunizations.
  • Take the time to thank the volunteers in your community for their efforts to provide childhood immunizations to everyone.

Do your part to help the children in your community. Spread awareness about the importance of infant immunizations in your area. Speak out against false immunization information.

Spread Awareness In Your Community

Serious diseases are a terrifying thing. However, medical advancements now prevent once common illness. Vaccines have nearly removed measles from the population. Take a moment during National Infant Immunization Week this month to recognize the important role infant immunizations play in your hometown. Let's work together to educate others about the infant vaccines. In addition, discover new ways to collaborate and spread immunization awareness. Lastly, work with the members of your community keep children safe. This April, work towards a future where no child ever suffers from a vaccine-preventable disease.